Jam session

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For other uses, see Jam session (disambiguation).
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A jam session is a musical event, process, or activity where musicians play (i.e. “jam”) by improvising without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. Jam sessions are often used by musicians to develop new material (music), find suitable arrangements, or simply as a social gathering and communal practice session. Jam sessions may be based upon existing songs or forms, may be loosely based on an agreed chord progression or chart suggested by one participant, or may be wholly improvisational. Jam sessions can range from very loose gatherings of amateurs to evenings where a jam session coordinator acts as a “gatekeeper” to ensure that only appropriate-level performers take the stage, to sophisticated improvised recording sessions by professionals which are intended to be edited and released to the public.

Jazz

The origin of the word “Jam Session”, came about when white and black musician would congregate together, in the 20’s, after their regular paying gigs, to play the jazz they couldn’t in the “Paul Whiteman” style bands. Bing Crosby would attend these sessions, and the jazz cats always said he was “jammin’ the beat”, since he would clap on the one and the three. So these sessions became known as “Jam Sessions”. [1]

The New York scene during World War II was famous for its after-hours jam sessions. One of the most famous was the regular after-hours jam at Minton’s Playhouse in New York City that ran in the 1940s and early 1950s. The jam sessions at Minton’s were a fertile meeting place and proving ground for both established soloists like Ben Webster and Lester Young, and the younger jazz musicians who would soon become leading exponents of the bebop movement, including Thelonious Monk (Minton’s house pianist), Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie. The Minton’s jams were legendary for their highly competitive “cutting contests“, in which soloists would try to keep up with the house band and outdo each other in improvisation skill.